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John Rodsted

John Rodsted

John’s career spans 40 years in the photographic industry. Originally trained as a commercial photographer, he set up his own studio in Melbourne when he was 22. Bored by the industry, he packed it in and hit the road in 1986 to become a photojournalist. The world has been his studio since and the past 30 years have been spent as a true gypsy wandering the world’s trouble spots. His career had had him working in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Bosnia, Sudan, Kosovo, Mozambique, West Sahara, Eritrea, Laos, and more recently Lebanon and East Timor to name but a few. His subject is mainly about communities at risk, ordinary people trying to survive the horrors of war. He is the official photographer to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines and part of the team that won the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize. His work has been widely exhibited globally in some of the world’s most prestigious venues including the Sydney Opera House, Royal Geographical Society, United Nations, The Hague and the Smithsonian Institute. 2006 had him working in the conflicts of East Timor and Lebanon and he was also a member of the Australian Government delegation to the United Nations in Geneva for the Meeting of States Parties to the Landmine Ban Treaty. He has also been an avid skydiver with over 3000 jumps to his credit and worked as a parachute instructor and a stuntman for films and commercials. He was the stunt double to the “Blue Power Ranger”. Since 2008 he has been appointed an Adjunct Professor and begun passing his knowledge over to students of photojournalism at Griffith University. On his rare time off he heads to the Arctic and Antarctic regions for a little wilderness guiding, wildlife photography and teaches polar photography. His work is becoming quickly collectable for his importance in both the Landmines and Cluster Munitions Treaties as well as his artistic pieces and large format landscapes. He now specialises in panoramic landscapes in black and white whilst still working the world’s trouble spots. He has just finished photographing a book in Cambodia’s east, ‘In Search of Safe Ground’.