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Talks by Rear Admiral John Lippiett

 

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Rear Admiral John Lippiett

John Lippiett had a 36 year career in the Royal Navy, serving in a large number of ships from aircraft carriers to minesweepers and deployed to all of the world’s operational theatres. He was second-in-command of the frigate HMS Ambuscade throughout the Falklands War, and his book “War and Peas; Intimate letters from the Falklands War” was broadcast on BBC’s Today programme for the 25th anniversary. John commanded three ships, a Frigate Squadron, and then the School of Maritime Warfare. On promotion to Rear Admiral, he flew his Flag at sea as Flag Officer Sea Training before serving in Naples as Chief of Staff of the NATO maritime forces in the Mediterranean. His final posting was as the Commandant of the Joint Services Command and Staff College. John retired and for nearly 13 years was the Chief Executive of the Mary Rose Trust, during which time he led the project to build the award-winning new museum and ensure Henry VIII’s flagship is conserved and displayed for future generations. John retired from the Mary Rose Trust in 2016 and spends much time back at sea as a speaker on maritime history - and this time with his wife Jenny. He much enjoys telling the stories both of exploration, often using old maps, and of naval ventures that have taken place on the world’s oceans over the last two thousand years.

 Europeans search for Terra Australis Incognita

In his third talk, John looks at how European mariners went searching for new lands in the Pacific in their quest for territory and valuable resources. This vast, seemingly empty, ocean saw countless adventures and disasters as the world map gradually developed through to the nineteenth century. There is a chance to catch some of the sunshine from afar while we await the chance to get back to our travels again!

 

Mariners map the Unknown World

John’s second talk picks up on the shape of the world as seen by the Greeks, and takes us to the 15th and 16th centuries when European sailors ventured ever farther afloat in their quest to find the fabled riches of the East. Great explorers such as Columbus, Vasco da Gama and Magellan made remarkable voyages that changed the shape of the then-known world, as illustrated in the contemporary maps. These were the early days of founding the Portuguese and Spanish global empires, and of their amassing great wealth.

 

Early Mariners of the Mediterranean

This first talk of a series introduces the story of how the Egyptians first became waterborne some 6,000 years ago on the Nile, and tells of the development of their boats into relatively sophisticated vessels in the succeeding millennia. The Phoenicians from the Levant became the major seafarers through the Mediterranean, followed by the Greeks. Sea trade led to exploration, colonisation, and wars, with many excitements along the way. The stories here end with the Roman Empire dominating the Mediterranean, Mare Nostrum, and paves the way with the trade into the Indian Ocean towards the next talk, which will look briefly at how the voyages of mariners in the following centuries went ever farther over the horizon to give a fuller understanding of the shape of the world.

 

Click here to view details of the upcoming cruises on which John will be Guest Speaker.